Recovering The SelfA Journal of Hope and Healing

Exercise and Fitness

Which Supplements Work Effectively with Your Exercise Routine?

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by David Ryan

Any experienced bodybuilder of fitness expert will tell you that the only bodybuilding supplements that work effectively areExercise ones taken in partnership with their surrounding supplements. While whey protein powder, for example, is an essential ingredient in getting you enough protein and increasing muscle mass, but without the various accompaniments, including a strict training regime and diet, it will do very little or even have negative effects, if you’re taking in more than you burn out.

Another thing to consider is that some of the premium products can be expensive, and buying a lot of different premium products can easily add up to over £100. For that reason, we want to know that we’re getting the best and the most essential products for our money. Without going too brand specific, here are the things you’ll definitely need to make sure you’re getting effective results when you exercise.

Protein Supplements

These are the key ingredient in muscle-building as protein works to rebuild the ripped muscle, hence the name ripped. These are generally sold as muscle-increasing or mass-increasing, which appeal to the two main types of consumers. Obviously you must consider which one is best for you, and a reliable and trusty brand is vital to ensure you get a product that has someone responsible for it, ergo one that will work.

Supplement Supplements

This is where it gets a little more complicated. If you’re taking on abnormal amounts of protein, your body will not naturally be able to process that, so a lot will go to waste. For this reason, things like amino acids become an essential part of your diet. Amino acids are the building blocks of protein, giving the protein you consume something to cling on to.

Stemming from this is glutamine, which some consider as being even more important than whey protein. Glutamine is released from muscles when they’re stressed, and once they become depleted, they can dehydrate the person, putting a serious dampener – no pun intended – on the exercise session.

There are two different types of glutamine available: free form and peptide-bonded. While they both work in similar ways, they have definite differences that should be considered before buying either.

Firstly, peptide-bonded is more expensive than free form and can be taken with food, but the price is obviously going to put anyone on a budget off buying it. Free form glutamine is cheaper than the former, but less ‘stable’, meaning that, amongst other things, it must be consumed on an empty stomach.

They are one of the most essential things, but multivitamins are also very important to make sure your body is getting everything it needs. While doing this, however, take note of any allergies you may have and whether or not they correspond to certain vitamin brands. Common allergies such as Nickel can cause issues here, so you may have to dig for a more niche brand.

Creatine

This is has previously been the scary one for amateurs, but it’s now cheaper, better quality and more accepted in mainstream supplement routines than it used to be. It’s a great ingredient for increasing muscle mass.

About the Author

David Ryan is a UK-based writer working on behalf of www.lamuscle.com and a keen health and fitness enthusiast. David enjoys spending his evenings and weekends visiting his local gym in Chester in his bid to create a god-like body. David also likes to keep fit by playing football every Thursday at the local high school’s AstroTurf. While he may not have the ability that he did in his younger days, David still loves playing each and every week. He loves watching all sorts of sports, such as football, formula one, mixed martial arts, and NBA basketball.

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Recovering The Self is a forum for people to tell their stories. Individual contributors accept complete responsibility for the veracity, accuracy, and non-infringement of their reporting.
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