Recovering The SelfA Journal of Hope and Healing

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Grief

Moving Forward after the Death of a Loved One

Posted on by in Grief

Guest Blogger: Lyndsi Decker

Although the prospect that you can lose a loved one in the near future is probably in the back of your mind, it is something you must brace yourself for now.

Smiles, optimism, and laughter

It will help to spend much of your time smiling a little and being optimistic – spending all day moping and looking sad will only exacerbate your grief while making those you come into contact with feel bad. It is also necessary to maintain a sense of humor. Think about something funny that has happened. By reading funny comic strips, telling jokes and doing anything else that makes you and others laugh, you will recuperate faster and more easily in addition to making people you see and talk with on a regular basis happier.

Reminiscing

It is smart to reminisce and reflect on the good times you had with your loved one. Thinking about the fun you had together and having a conversation about this with others who are willing to talk about it will make the healing process smoother.

Listening to music

Hearing music you like is a fantastic way to make your grief disappear much sooner. While hearing songs you like a lot on the radio, you may sway your head back and forth to a beat that pumps me up. Playing the piano gives me pleasure and a feeling of achievement.

Spending time with family and friends
Spend more time with those who mean a lot to you. It will give you less time to be miserable.

Giving a testimonial

At the memorial service, I discussed the good times I recently had with my mom. Doing this enabled me to express the importance of cherishing the time we have with those we love.

Staying physically and emotionally strong

It is crucial to eat an adequate amount of food and continue to pursue your hobbies. The loved one you lost would want you to go on living your life through peace and joy.

Finally, you should rent storage units to keep your deceased family member’s belongings in until you decide what to do with them.

About the Author

Lyndsi Decker is a freelance writer and is currently promoting self storage Riverside CA and storage units Chicago. She is also a mother of two and enjoys blogging about home and family.

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Recovering The Self is a forum for people to tell their stories. Individual contributors accept complete responsibility for the veracity, accuracy, and non-infringement of their reporting.
Inclusion in Recovering The Self is neither an endorsement nor a confirmation of claims presented within. Sole responsibility lies with individual contributors, not the editor, staff, or management of Recovering The Self Journal.