Recovering The SelfA Journal of Hope and Healing

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Parenting

PACT Teaches Parents to Take Back Control From an Angry Child

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PACT Teaches Parents to Take Back Control From an Angry Child http://digg.com/u17Amp

Meet Spike. He’s just a kid, but he’s in control. His parents walk around on eggshells, constantly appeasing him so he doesn’t throw another temper tantrum, embarrass them, or even assault them. But Spike’s days of dominance are numbered.

Few things are more frustrating or frightening than an out of control child. Parents who deal with an chronically angry child often feel alone, hopeless, and worried about their child’s future. Dr. Andrew Gibson reveals how to resolve the situation in his new book “Got An Angry Kid? Parenting Spike: A Seriously Difficult Child” (ISBN 9781932690897, Loving Healing Press, 2009).

Dr. Andrew Gibson, creator of Parenting Angry Children and Teens (PACT) Training, has written “Got An Angry Child?” to share his successful methods with parents everywhere in a format that is easy to follow and offers practical techniques for change. “Got An Angry Child?” is for any parent with a child who is acting out, angry, or has been diagnosed with a psychiatric label such as Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), oppositional defiance, conduct disorder, or bi-polar disorder. PACT training has already helped thousands of parents and children restore love and integrity to their relationships.

At the center of “Got An Angry Child?” is Spike, a fictional version of the many angry children with whom Dr. Gibson has helped parents to deal. In fact, Dr. Gibson had his own angry child; instead of giving up, he tried different strategies until he found what worked. PACT Training was developed from his experiences. By depicting Spike’s behavior in “Got An Angry Child?” Dr. Gibson demonstrates what behaviors parents should employ in different scenarios, beginning with no longer reacting to the child’s anger.

PACT works because the angry child is not involved and cannot disrupt the training. Change will happen without the angry child’s conscious participation. Dr. Gibson knows Spike won’t listen to his parents so most verbalization is removed from the program. PACT is not therapy. It is management. Parents model the behavior they want Spike to display. By his parents being consistent, Spike comes to believe they are serious, and he will adjust. The behaviors to bring about Spike’s change are all described in “Got An Angry Child?”

Experts and parents are grateful for how PACT training has saved families. Helen Lawrence, retired from the Connecticut State Department of Children and Families, says, “PACT is one of the very few services which has been held in high regard by our professional staff as well as the families which benefited from Dr. Gibson’s excellent program.” Ms. K.M., single mother of an out-of-control son, says, “PACT is my best chance to [create] change. Thanks for everything.” Mrs. D.W., mother of an emotionally disturbed boy, says, “Although I was only a few weeks into PACT, I felt myself becoming calmer, more hopeful, and more in control. PACT is putting life into my parenting and does what three years of residential placement didn’t.” PACT and “Got An Angry Kid?” clearly contain the answers sought by thousands of frustrated parents.

About the Author
Dr. Andrew Gibson earned his Ph.D. in Education at the University of Connecticut in 1987 under the tutelage of Richard Bloomer. He poured everything about his childhood and his experience as a parent into what became Parenting Angry Children and Teens (PACT) Training and the book, “Got An Angry Kid?” In 1993, the Connecticut State Department of Children and Families adopted the PACT methodology. Since then 500 families have completed the year-long program with remarkable results.

Got An Angry Kid? Parenting Spike: A Seriously Difficult Child” (ISBN 9781932690897, Loving Healing Press, 2009) can be purchased through local and online bookstores. For more information, visit www.dragibson.com.

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