Recovering The SelfA Journal of Hope and Healing

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Parenting

Calm Parenting: How to Manage Troubled and Angry Teens

Guest Blogger: Kim S. troubled teens

When you are a parent, it can often feel like your child becomes an entirely different species as they enter their teenage years. It is essential to keep the lines of communication open between you and your teenager, especially if he or she is troubled. The trouble may be having issues with drugs or alcohol, promiscuity, or even falling victim to bullying by their peers. Regardless of the issue, your child needs to know you are there to help them now as much as you were when they were little.

There are several things you can do to find ways to deal with your troubled teen now. Do not put it off or think it is a phase they will grow out of eventually. Facing troubles now can save heartache later.

Remember the Teenager You Love

It can be difficult, overwhelming and nearly impossible at times to focus on anything else but the behavior you hate. However, focusing on the love you feel for your son or daughter can help you place the anger you feel towards them on the back burner and focus on the root cause of the problems.

Be on Your Teen’s Team

Think back to when you were a teenager, with all of the peer pressure, societal and parental pressure, and hormonal changes, it often felt like it was you against the world. While you do not have to approve, endorse, or support hurtful or negative behavior on the part of your child, you can reiterate that you are on their side and you are there for them, no matter what.

Include Your Teen

Many teens resort to detrimental behavior because it is the one thing they can control in a world that often seems out of their control. When you sit down and talk to your teen about their troubles, get them involved in coming up with an acceptable solution. This can help them feel like they are still in the driver’s seat and are much more willing to allow you a spot in the passenger seat rather than kicking you out of the car.

There are times when drastic measures are needed and necessary. Your teen may hate you at the time, but it is much better to have an alive child mad at you than a dead child who no longer feels anything. Drastic measures may include visiting a licensed psychologist or even a wilderness camp designed for troubled youth.

About the Guest Author

Kim S. writes for many online establishments and currently partners with TheFamilyCompass.com in spreading awareness about troubled and depressed teenagers (and how to deal with them). The Family Compass aims to increase awareness on the current psychological and societal status of today’s teens and how these factors affect the future of our society.

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Recovering The Self is a forum for people to tell their stories. Individual contributors accept complete responsibility for the veracity, accuracy, and non-infringement of their reporting.
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