Recovering The SelfA Journal of Hope and Healing

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Mindfulness

How to Cope with Stress When Moving

Guest Blogger: Heather Roberts

A lot of people believe that moving houses is the most stressful event they can endure. However, there are plenty of ways to reduce stress when in the process of moving. You can even turn it all into a positive experience and actually enjoy the event. Here are some guidelines to help.

1. Make sure you have enough time
Do your best to plan ahead. You can easily get all stressed out because of lack of time. Allow yourself at least a month or two to carefully plan the moving. Especially if you are going to be moving during the summer, you will need to plan as early as possible, for it is the busiest season.

2. Be organized
Prepare a list of the tasks that need to be done and make sure they are divided into weeks. This way you will have enough days for the completion of everything on the list. The list is the most useful companion you can have during the move.

3. Get rid of the clutter
Now this has to be the first step of your actual moving. Since you are most probably not going to be taking with you EVERYTHING that is in the house, you will need to clear out what you don’t need. Undoubtedly, there is plenty of it in the garage, attic, basement. Consider organizing a yard sale. Not only will you get rid of the junk, but you will also make some money. It’s a win-win situation.

4. Get help
Stress might occur when the whole moving thing turns out to be more than you can handle on your own. It might be difficult to come to terms with yourself and ask for help, but actually that’s what friends and family are for. Plus, it may be one of your last opportunities to spend time together, especially if you are moving far away.

5. Say goodbye
Don’t let negative emotions overcome you because you couldn’t bid farewell to your favorite people. Throw a party, or at least make a quiet evening get-together. Same with your favorite spots in your hometown – visit them as often as possible during your last month before the leave.

6. Treat yourself
During this stressful moving time, people are usually so busy planning and getting things done that they often neglect themselves and their needs. It all builds up to the point where one starts despising the moving because it robs him of precious ‘self-time’. So, don’t deprive yourself from the treats you deserve. Just because you are going through an important period of your life, it does not mean that your whole time must be occupied by it. Allow yourself pleasant treats like going to the movies, having dinner with friends, going to a football game, etc. Eat well and get enough sleep. Sure you will be nervous and tense, but that does not mean you will have to live on coffee.

7. Have a backup plan
You can be the most organized mover in the world, but still there are some things you simply cannot predict and control. What if the men from the moving company are late, or if the weather is bad? You need to know how to act and what to do in such situations in advance, so you wouldn’t have to panic if they occur.

Remember that the stressful situations can continue even after you move. The first few days at your new place will be a real challenge – chaos and boxes everywhere. It’s pretty easy to get frustrated. However, try to remain calm. Do one thing at a time and remember: Rome was not built in a day.

 

About the Author

Heather Roberts is a content writer from London, UK. She has great flair for decoration and interior design. She is searching for new challenges and hence often moves to different places. Therefore her present article is focused on how to easily recover if you moved to a new town.

 

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Recovering The Self is a forum for people to tell their stories. Individual contributors accept complete responsibility for the veracity, accuracy, and non-infringement of their reporting.
Inclusion in Recovering The Self is neither an endorsement nor a confirmation of claims presented within. Sole responsibility lies with individual contributors, not the editor, staff, or management of Recovering The Self Journal.