Recovering The SelfA Journal of Hope and Healing

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Natural Healing: The Best Herbal Remedies to Take After an Accident

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Centuries ago, people who were considered healers were also branded as witches and this was allGinseng because they knew the healing properties of different herbs and flowers found in the fields and verges of the surrounding countryside.

Today we recognize the merits of natural healing and remedies which can be both effective and useful in everyday life especially if a minor injury has been sustained.

Many people are unhappy about using chemical methods and drugs obtained from medical practitioners, but it must be remembered to check first whether the particular herbal remedy chosen is safe.

This is particularly true if prescription medicines are also being taken. Make sure any preparation is licensed and recommended by the correct professional bodies. It always pays to be careful and taking the incorrect herbal remedy could do more harm than good.

Consider Alternative Remedies

Many doctors simply print out a prescription without giving a thought to alternative remedies. They can’t help it; it is the way they have been trained. Sometimes popping pills can be unnecessary and herbal remedies can equally do the job just as well and sometimes without the side effects that come with the prescription drugs.

Ask the doctor whether an alternative medicament can be used. Obviously be guided by them, but be persistent. Arnica cream was liberally used when I sustained a fall from my horse. Luckily, no bones were broken and the only injury suffered was aching and severe bruising. Slathering on the cream brought the bruise out and eased the aching effectively.

Common Natural Remedies

  • Aloe Vera is known for its soothing properties and is added to many face creams as it has excellent rejuvenating and moisturising properties. The juice from the plant can be used for its digestive properties and the cream to heal cuts and burns. However, it must not be used on surgical wounds as it will slow the healing process and it will not ease the burns suffered from radiation therapy.
  • Oil of Evening Primrose is used most commonly for menstrual problems. It can also be used for rheumatoid arthritis, breast pain and eczema. Poultices from the plant can be used to ease wounds and bruises. Indeed, it has a wide range of healing properties.
  • Commonly used in the kitchen as a spice, ginger is also an excellent cold remedy and can be drunk as a warming tea. It is also used to ease stomach disorders and nausea and can be effective in saliva production and constipation. Some people use it for easing pain from joint or muscle injuries or osteo- and rheumatoid arthritis, although it seems the alimentary canal benefits most from its healing properties.
  • Ginseng is a perennial favourite as a general pick-me-up. It has stimulant properties and has been used in diverse ways such as treating type II diabetes and curing sexual dysfunction! Regular usage is believed to increase general quality of life and it is added to numerous drinks found on supermarket shelves.
  • Garlic has long been used in alternative medicine as a remedy for digestive and respiratory problems, lack of energy, and to reduce cholesterol. Patients suffering from atherosclerosis and hypertension have also gained benefit from usage.

These remedies prove it is not always necessary to take prescription medicine. They are just as effective and have been used for centuries. Give them a try and experience the benefit of natural medicine.

This guest post has been contributed today for Hughes Carlisle Solicitors. Have you suffered a recent injury that you believe deserves compensation? Visit the Hughes Carlisle site or write to one of our team of dedicated and expert solicitors: 659 – 661 West Derby Road, Liverpool, L13 8AG

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Recovering The Self is a forum for people to tell their stories. Individual contributors accept complete responsibility for the veracity, accuracy, and non-infringement of their reporting.
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