Recovering The SelfA Journal of Hope and Healing

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Health

Dental Tips for Tobacco Addicted Teens

smiling woman breaking cigarette and no smoking conceptDental Tips for Tobacco Addicted Teens by John Gary

We all know that smoking is bad for your health but many people continue to use tobacco products, even teenagers. One of the most affected areas of the body, when it comes to tobacco use, is the mouth area. Oral health risk is very high when using cigarettes or chewing tobacco. The mouth area can be affected greatly with many issues including teeth and gum problems, even oral cancer.

It is important for tobacco users, even teens, to practice good dental hygiene. Smokers have an increased risk to gum disease and this can lead to plague buildup, which can eventually leave to tooth decay and even tooth loss. The harmful chemicals in cigarette smoke lead to tooth loss at a faster rate than for non-smokers. There are dental tips that can help you to improve overall oral health if you are going to smoke. Consider these tips to help you reduce the risk of oral issues.

Quitting

Of course the most effective way to avoid oral health issues is to quit smoking. This may prove to be very difficult or you may not be ready to quit. Interested individuals will need to work hard to quit smoking as it is quite addictive. Teens have a better opportunity of breaking the habit of tobacco use as they will not have used the products for an extended period of time. Products such as gum and patches can work well to break the habit. Consult a physician if you are considering an alternative to quit smoking.

Everyday Oral Cleaning

It is important for tobacco users to practice proper oral hygiene every day. This means to brush, floss, and use a tongue cleaner every time you brush. Mouthwash should also be used to remove any harmful chemical residue or contaminants.

Proper Toothbrush

A proper toothbrush is needed to clean the teeth of a tobacco user. The bristles should be stiff and strong to help remove the tar stains that are on the teeth from tobacco. You need an angled brush that can help you reach the hard places in the back of the mouth, especially the gums.

Tobacco Toothpaste

For cleaning the mouth, there is a specific type of toothpaste that is made for smokers. This toothpaste uses stronger chemicals so that the bacteria and stains are easier to remove. Consult your dentist to determine if you need a special toothpaste.

Check-Ups

Regular cleanings and oral check-ups are important as well. Make regular appointments and keep these appointments so that your mouth is inspected and cleaned on a regular basis. This will help your overall oral health when combined with your daily cleanings.

Check Your Mouth Regularly

When using tobacco products, you are placing your mouth at risk. Inspect your mouth on a regular basis for irregularities such as discolored patches, bleeding, swelling or lumps. This could be a sign of serious issues and you will need to consult your dentist.

After Quitting

If you manage to quit smoking or using tobacco products, you may find your teeth are in need of repair. One common treatment in the United States is veneers. The price of veneers will vary according to treatment area. For example, in Cincinnati the average price range for a veneer ranges from $8,000 to $15,000 or more, depending on the work you need done. You may find a dentist in a small town offers the same service for a lower price. This is just one of many treatments that can be done to gain back a beautiful smile.

Overall, it is important for teens and adults to limit or stop tobacco use. The risk of oral health issues is far too great and can lead to tooth loss and even death.

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Recovering The Self is a forum for people to tell their stories. Individual contributors accept complete responsibility for the veracity, accuracy, and non-infringement of their reporting.
Inclusion in Recovering The Self is neither an endorsement nor a confirmation of claims presented within. Sole responsibility lies with individual contributors, not the editor, staff, or management of Recovering The Self Journal.