Recovering The SelfA Journal of Hope and Healing

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5 Tips to Ensure Environment-Friendly Detoxification of the Body

By Dr. Edward F. Group

Believe it or not, there are toxins everywhere. There are toxic elements in the water you drink, the food you eat, the air you breathe…the list goes on and on. Following are five different ways that toxins enter your body along with five tips to help you detoxify your body safely.

The Food We Eat

The standard American diet is anything but healthy. We rely on pre-cooked foods, processed foods, fast food—anything that’s quick and easy. Unfortunately, “quick and easy” comes chocked full of toxins. But even staying away from “convenience” foods won’t automatically get rid of the toxins you ingest. So-called healthy foods, like fruits and vegetables, come with their own toxins—those in pesticides, chemical fertilizers, and other chemical applications that are made to both the produce and the soil. The best way to reduce the amount of toxins that you ingest via food is to eat organic, fresh foods. Organic foods aren’t produced with harmful pesticides and fertilizers, ensuring that you get all the nutrients without the load of toxins to go along with it.

The Beverages We Drink

Too many of us drink beverages that aren’t good for us. We load up on sodas and coffee, ignoring the dangers and toxins in caffeine, refined sugar, and artificial sweeteners. Instead of relying on easy drinks like soda and coffee, go for the healthier options of herbal tea and freshly-squeezed fruit juice.

The Air We Breathe

Every day, we breathe in toxins. However, what you may find shocking is that indoor air pollution can actually be more harmful than the air we breathe outdoors. Studies show that indoor air is up to ten times more contaminated than outdoor air. Even scarier is the statistic that the average American spends approximately 90% of his or her life indoors. That great insulation that saves you money on your heating bill in the colder months is actually doing another job, too—keeping airborne toxins inside your home. To reduce the amount of toxins inside your home, invest in a high-quality air purifier.

The Water We Drink

It’s necessary for us to drink a good amount of water each day. In fact, the Institute of Medicine recommends that males drink approximately 3 liters each day and females drink approximately 2.2 liters each day. However, did it ever occur to you that the water you’re drinking may be laden with toxins? There are many toxic elements that can be found in the majority of public drinking water including arsenic, fluoride, and chlorine. To decrease the amount of toxins in your drinking water, install a water purification unit.

The Stress We Feel

That’s right—stress can be toxic! Extreme levels of any negative emotion can cause stress hormones to affect your digestion. Additionally, people that are stressed don’t typically make the effort to take care of their bodies. In order to beat out stress and keep those toxins at bay, try meditation—its powers to de-stress are staggering!

You heard it here—by eating organic, fresh foods; drinking healthy beverages such as herbal tea; investing in an air purification system; installing a water purification system; and meditating, you can help to reduce the amount of toxins that you ingest during your daily life.

(Picture Credit: NYTimes.com, Steve Lower)

About the Author

Dr. Edward F. Group III has authored several books including The Green Body Cleanse and Complete Colon Cleanse as well as a number of articles that have been internationally published. He is also the creator of the revolutionary Oxy-Powder colon cleansing program.

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Recovering The Self is a forum for people to tell their stories. Individual contributors accept complete responsibility for the veracity, accuracy, and non-infringement of their reporting.
Inclusion in Recovering The Self is neither an endorsement nor a confirmation of claims presented within. Sole responsibility lies with individual contributors, not the editor, staff, or management of Recovering The Self Journal.