Recovering The SelfA Journal of Hope and Healing

Animals

6 Tips for Keeping Your House Clean When You Have a Dog

by Monica Mendoza

When you think about life at home with a dog, what do you first picture in your head? A new dog owner might summon an idyllic image of ringing the doorbell, being met with great excitement, and stretching their legs out on the couch while their furry friend calmly curls up to sleep.

But to a dog owner who has gotten used to this life, reality consists of dog hair being shed everywhere, chew marks and scratch marks all over, and the distinctive smell that makes guests well aware of the pet’s presence. Get past this, and build a clean, happy, and welcoming environment for your precious pupper, your family members, and your future visitors! Here are 6 handy tips for keeping your house clean when you have a dog.

1. Keep your dog spiffy and well-groomed.

Keeping your house clean must start, of course, with your dog itself! Paying special attention to your dog makes a big difference not only in the wellbeing of your home, but also in your dog’s health, hygiene, and habits. Give your dog a bath regularly or as needed (most can be scrubbed up once a week); brush and trim their coats regularly to keep their hair neat and tidy. Outfit your dog with a high-quality dog collar to keep them secure around the house, and in line with their house training. Lastly, check up on your dog’s health, as in general, a healthy dog will be a less likely host for germs and bacteria that you wouldn’t want around your guests and your children.

2. Regularly wash and replace everything as needed.

Don’t wait until the last minute to clean up dog beds, dog bowls, dog toys, carpets, and floors. Be conscientious in washing household items that have come in contact with your dog. In addition, try and replace items that have been worn out, chewed up, frayed because of scratching, or stained with constant use. Later on, invest in longer-lasting and more durable items that can hold out for you and your dog.

3. Vacuum regularly.

On the topic of maintenance, have your vacuum cleaner at hand and ready to take out any remainders of dog hair or dirt on your rugs and furniture. Living with a dog can get “hairy,” pun intended. Make it a habit to clean up all debris that is a consequence of your dog’s activity. Also consider getting furniture that is even easier to clean, such as those upholstered in leather or microfiber, so that vacuuming will be a breeze.

4. Steer free of clutter around your house.

Stack up and organize any stray items, such as your kid’s toys, pillows, shoes, books, magazines, and the like; untangle and tie up any loose electrical wires. Limit how tempted your dog will be to pick up any of these items, throw them around, or shred them. But this also serves as a reminder to decrease clutter that may prove a danger to your dog, such as choking hazards or inducers of electric shock.

5. Deodorize.

Having a pet means, by default, making do with all its “natural” (read: funky) smells. Once again, you will need to bathe your dog and groom its eyes, hair, nails, and the like. But combating the house’s odors can also be as simple as tidying up leftovers (especially those that are dangerous for dogs), cleaning gunk off of floors and cabinets, and putting small dishes of baking soda in your cabinets or countertops. Also be aware of using strong fumes or chemicals that might prove especially harmful to your dog.

6. Be resourceful in what you use to maintain your house.

A whole array of cleaning products is available in the market, but make other common items a part of your house-cleaning routine. You can make use of old newspapers for potty training, and clean old rags to wipe down your dog’s paws after a long day outside. Clean can also mean eco-friendly, and there are lots of opportunities for a dog owner to keep up with this lifestyle.

In short, the solution to keeping your house clean is to look after your dog’s welfare, to be thorough with your surroundings, and to start good cleaning habits. Then, you’ll have a home life for your entire family, people and puppers alike, to look forward to.

About the Author

Monica Mendoza is the manager for a fortune 500 company. She counts communication coaching and personality development among her passions. In her spare time, she engages in writing, gardening, surfing, and hiking.

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Recovering The Self is a forum for people to tell their stories. Individual contributors accept complete responsibility for the veracity, accuracy, and non-infringement of their reporting.
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