Recovering The SelfA Journal of Hope and Healing

cropped-butterfly-header.jpg

Addiction

How Drug Addiction Affects the Family

Guest Blogger: Amie Siegle

You often hear of the evils associated with drug and alcohol abuse. You hear the horror stories of how these people live their lives because of their additions. You see promotional materials all over that encourage those with a substance abuse problem to seek help from drug rehab or alcohol rehab. However, you never see the truth about what these problems create for their families.

The parents of an addict must always remain in an alert state. While these parents may have tried to send their child into drug rehab or alcohol rehab, the sad truth is that there is always a possibility for relapse.

These parents must feel their hearts race each time their child is not there and the phone rings with an unexpected call. They must hesitantly answer it, wondering if it is the hospital, the police, or a call from jail. They must be prepared for a slurred voice on the other end requesting a ride or money.

These same parents must also learn to hide all of their valuables, medications, and anything that may be used as a weapon in a fit of rage. They must live within a shell in their own homes because it is the only way they can protect their child.

The siblings of the addict always find themselves set-aside. While they may be excelling in every way, the parents always have the addict first and foremost on their mind. Siblings become jealous and resentful, which is only natural.

Friends of the family begin to stay away, or only want to connect socially if it is done away from the home where the addict is living. They have become accustomed to the episodes they see, the parents in despair, and the overall chaos now associated with the family. While they still love their friends, they no longer want to be social unless it is under specific conditions.

The children of addicts are, perhaps, the ones that suffer most. These children are often emotionally and physically abused. They are lonely children that do not excel in school. They are survivors that often have a poor outlook on life.

Their parents’ first and foremost concern is their addiction, not the children. These children grow up thinking that they are not important, and this often leads to a cycle of addition in the next generation.

Many people are often heard saying, “It is their life; if they want to be an addict; it hurts no one but themselves.” The truth is, however, being an addict hurts everyone.

 

About the Author

Amie Siegle is a popular blogger in the counseling industry specializing in alcohol and drug rehab. When she’s not blogging she enjoys camping and spending time with her family.

Share This Page

PinIt

Related Posts

Read in Your Language

DISCLAIMER: please read

Recovering The Self is a forum for people to tell their stories. Individual contributors accept complete responsibility for the veracity, accuracy, and non-infringement of their reporting.
Inclusion in Recovering The Self is neither an endorsement nor a confirmation of claims presented within. Sole responsibility lies with individual contributors, not the editor, staff, or management of Recovering The Self Journal.