Recovering The SelfA Journal of Hope and Healing

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Abuse Recovery

Boot Camp for Troubled Teens May Restore Many Lives

Guest Blogger:  Rosy Cooperboot camp

Today’s teens have troubles coming from different directions. Restlessness, anxiety, and a lot of questions are trademarks of being young. But, in any case, if these trademarks are not channelized properly, they can cause havoc in the life of a young person as well as their family. For those who have difficulties coping with the pressures of youth and reach for drugs and alcohol, there are many options including boot camp for troubled youth. Such camps offer various troubled youth programs that can change the direction of a young person and give them a great insight into the meaning of life.

Beginning of the problems

One of the most common features among the troubled youth is their intelligence. They may be more intelligent than their peers. Sometimes, their smarts turn into a habit of manipulation and pushing their boundaries. They may be manipulating their parents, grandparents, sisters, brothers, or anyone whom they are close with. And, this gradually turns into stealing, cheating, and lying. And, this becomes such a habit that they often forget that they have become liars and cheaters.

Here are the common symptoms of the trouble

  • Out of control behavior
  • Anger
  • Low self-esteem
  • Runaway behavior
  • Lack of motivation
  • Rebellion against authority
  • Drug/alcohol abuse
  • ADD or ADHD
  • Expulsion or suspension from school
  • Defiant behavior
  • Unmanageable

Main Focus of rehabilitation programs

The major focus of such rehabilitation programs is to make the teens understand their own blocks. Professionals providing these services make sure that the teens trust them and open up so that they can identify the problem.

The moment the teen arrives at such a center, there are vibes of positivity that promote self-approval, personal growth, and successful future. Some agencies adopt multi-level merit system wherein appropriate behavior earns the rewards and inappropriate one is questioned and assessed.

Ways of counseling

One of the methods is peer group counseling. It is a tool to develop a sense of personal awareness and responsibility. For this, a highly successful model is called a 12-step model. With this model, guidance is given to face prior choices and those choices are given a supportive and nurturing surrounding. Issues such as alcohol/substance abuse, anger, rebellion, lack of motivation, and low self-esteem are seen as pieces of a larger picture and dealt with sensibility and sensitivity.

Some of the most popular methods

  • One on One (Teen) & One on One (Family)
  • Fireside NA/AA Meetings
  • Guest Speakers
  • Process Groups, Morning Meditation (Teens & Families)
  • Parents’ Meeting (When My Teen Comes Home) (Open Forum)
  • Graduate Speakers

Outcome of such camps

When such camps are held by the skilled counselors, successful role models, responsive listeners, it is bound to yield positive results. One of the major results is the peace and reunion of the family.

Such results are achieved by various methods and taking advantage of the heightened emotional access which is produced by outdoor environment and adventure of travels. Such programs often include real life experiences, difficult challenges, counseling, recovery and education. All these result in a youth who has become much more patient, tolerant, and responsible.

About the Author  

Rosy Cooper has been working with troubled youth since years. She has even designed programs for such boot camp for troubled youth. Her views on the subject are widely read and respected.

 

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Recovering The Self is a forum for people to tell their stories. Individual contributors accept complete responsibility for the veracity, accuracy, and non-infringement of their reporting.
Inclusion in Recovering The Self is neither an endorsement nor a confirmation of claims presented within. Sole responsibility lies with individual contributors, not the editor, staff, or management of Recovering The Self Journal.